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Old 22nd November 2013, 03:38   #1  |  Link
WorBry
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Demuxing HDV m2t with Project-X

Wasn't quite sure which forum section was appropriate for this query, so I'm posting it here.

I'm looking at using Project-X to batch demux m2t files (captured with HDVSplit from a Canon HDV camcorder) to m2v + mp2 .....unless there's a simpler way to do it? Other demuxers I've tried require m2ts. The intent is to convert to mp4...unless, again, there is an easier/direct way to do that?

It's the first time I've used Project-X. Ran some test files and the demux appeared to complete - except that that the log recorded 3 errors (highlighted in red below). Are these significant and/or is there something I need to alter in the Project-X settings? I just used the defaults.

If it's of any significance, these clips were recorded on the camcorder in 25 PsF (progressive segmented frame) mode i.e. progressive, but flagged as interlaced.

Here's an example log:

Code:
Friday, November 22, 2013  3:10:32 AM HST
ProjectX 0.91.0.00 (31.03.2011)

-> working with collection 0
 
-> save normal log file
-> log 'packets out of sequence' / bit errors
-> log 'missing startcodes'
-> log 'PES header found in ES'
-> log WSS
-> log VPS
-> log RDS
-> log max. 500 warnings/errors
-> write all video data
-> write all other data
-> patch c.d.flagged infos of pictures
-> add sequence end code
-> set resolution in SDE 
-> PVA: strictly specs. for audio streams
-> VOB: determine diff. Cell timelines
-> TS: ignore scrambled packets
-> TS: enhanced search for open packets
-> TS: join file segments (of Dreambox®)
-> TS: generate PMT stream dependent
-> get only enclosed PES/TS packets
-> concatenate different recordings
-> ensure 1st PES-packet start with video
-> generate PCR/SCR from PTS
 
-> write output files to: 'U:\Home Movies\HDVCapture\Project X Demux Test'

-> main I/O-Buffersize in bytes 4096000 bytes

FileSegments:
* (0) U:\Home Movies\HDVCapture\Project X Demux Test\hv20 hdv further tests-2013_11_09-13_03_30.m2t
second. Files:
* ---

+> Input File 0:  'U:\Home Movies\HDVCapture\Project X Demux Test\hv20 hdv further tests-2013_11_09-13_03_30.m2t' (62,492,892 bytes)
-> Filetype is TS (generic PES Container)
-> demux
-> Service ID 0x0064
-> PMT 0x0081 refers to these usable streams:
Video:
PID: 0x0810(MPEG-2)
Audio:
PID: 0x0814(Mpg1)
PID: 0x0815[PD]
Teletext:
n/a
Subpict.:
n/a

--> PID 0x1FFF => stuffing packet -> ignored
ok> PID 0x0810 has PES-ID 0xE0 (MPEG Video) (2444 #14) 
-> PID 0x0815(private stream 2) -> ignored
ok> PID 0x0814 has PES-ID 0xC0 (MPEG Audio) (33276 #178) 
!> PID 0x0000 (PAT) (105468 #562) -> ignored
!> PID 0x0081 (PMT) (274292 #1460) -> ignored
-> PID 0x0811(private stream 2) -> ignored
-> video basics: 1440*1080 @ 25fps @ 0.7031 (16:9) @ 25000000 bps - vbv 448
-> starting export of video data @ GOP# 0
!> PID 0x001F (SIT) (2890312 #15375) -> ignored
packs: 320150 100% 62492892

++> Mpg Video: PID 0x0810 / PesID 0xE0 / SubID 0x00 :
-> Video: fr-ct-1p-cg-og-dg -> 456-0-0-38-0-0
-> Video length: 456 frames @ 00:00:18.240
-> GOP summary: min. 24, max. 24 fields; contains interlaced frames
-> avg. nom. bitrate 24991963bps (min/max: 22457600/26989200)
-> set first sequenceheader bitrate to 9000000bps
---> new File: U:\Home Movies\HDVCapture\Project X Demux Test\hv20 hdv further tests-2013_11_09-13_03_30.m2v

++> Mpg Audio: PID 0x0814 / PesID 0xC0 / SubID 0x00 :
-> check CRC of AC-3 / MPEG-Audio L1,2
-> remove CRC in MPEG-Audio L1,2
-> add frames
-> Audio PTS: first packet 00:01:47.960, last packet 00:02:06.392
-> Video PTS: start 1.GOP 00:01:47.960, end last GOP 00:02:06.200
-> adjusting audio at video-timeline
-> src_audio: MPEG-1, Layer2, 48000Hz, stereo, 384kbps, CRC @ 00:00:00.000
audio frames: wri-pre-skip-ins-add 760-0-0-0-0 @ 00:00:18.240 done...
---> new File: 'U:\Home Movies\HDVCapture\Project X Demux Test\hv20 hdv further tests-2013_11_09-13_03_30.mp2'

summary of created media files:
.Video (m2v):	456 Frames	00:00:18.240		'U:\Home Movies\HDVCapture\Project X Demux Test\hv20 hdv further tests-2013_11_09-13_03_30.m2v'
Audio 00 (mp2):	760 Frames	00:00:18.240	0-0-0-0	'U:\Home Movies\HDVCapture\Project X Demux Test\hv20 hdv further tests-2013_11_09-13_03_30.mp2'
=> 57,857,196 bytes written...
-> we have 3 warnings/errors.
Cheers.
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Old 22nd November 2013, 05:38   #2  |  Link
poisondeathray
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WorBry View Post

I'm looking at using Project-X to batch demux m2t files (captured with HDVSplit from a Canon HDV camcorder) to m2v + mp2 .....unless there's a simpler way to do it? Other demuxers I've tried require m2ts. The intent is to convert to mp4...unless, again, there is an easier/direct way to do that?
for batch demuxing using ffmpeg

Code:
for %a in ("*.m2t") do ffmpeg -i "%a" -vcodec copy "%~na.m2v" -acodec copy "%~na.mp2"

Can you clarify what you meant by "intent is to convert to MP4 ?" What kind of video and audio ? Any restrictions or intended targets (e.g. devices) ?
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Old 22nd November 2013, 19:40   #3  |  Link
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why ProjectX?
There are more appropriate demuxers around?
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Old 23rd November 2013, 00:52   #4  |  Link
WorBry
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poisondeathray View Post
for batch demuxing using ffmpeg

Code:
for %a in ("*.m2t") do ffmpeg -i "%a" -vcodec copy "%~na.m2v" -acodec copy "%~na.mp2"
I'm afraid I've never used FFMPEG and so wouldn't know how to apply that command line. I should maybe clue myself up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by poisondeathray View Post
Can you clarify what you meant by "intent is to convert to MP4 ?" What kind of video and audio ? Any restrictions or intended targets (e.g. devices) ?
Reasons for converting to mp4 ?. Two fold:

1. To see if the free GoPro Studio editing suite, primarily intended for editing Hero action cam footage and using the Cineform codec, has potential value for editing HDV footage; given that Cineform Aspect HD, before GoPro took over, originally came into vogue as a manageable intra-frame 'intermediate' format for editing HDV and DVCProHD. Turns out the GoPro suite is more picky and requires mp4 or mov video files for input.

After posting last night I did try loading some HDV clips, demuxed with Project-X and re-muxed to mp4, but they were rejected outright; I wondered if was related to the 'errors' reported by Projext-X, but on further inquiry, it appears that the GoPro editor only accepts H.264, which seems ironic given Cineform's origins. So that's a non-starter.

That said, with the GoPro suite installed, the Cineform codec can be accessed as a free-standing vfw codec that makes available the 'legacy' input configuration options, including anamorphic 1440 x 1080. As such, it can be used like any other vfw codec for encoding via AVISynth/Virtual Dub, and the resultant avi encodes can, if desired, be used as an 'intermediate' format for frame-accurate editing/smart rendering in a video editor that is vfw codec based (mine included, Corel Video Studio). Personally, in that case I prefer to use a 'lossless' codec (FFDShow Huff-YV12), so Cineform (as a 'lossy' codec) would offer no particular advantage, other than providing greater economy in file size. Even so, from my own tests, I was quite impressed with the quality of Cineform (as judged visually and by quality metrics) and, in particular, its capacity to retain that level of quality over multiple re-compression cycles.

2. Of more casual interest - to see how well native HDV MPEG2 streams (remuxed to mp4) play when streamed over LAN to an iPAD4. The conclusion - reasonably well, considering it relies on software decoding, but depending on the iPAD player app used. I wondered also if it was possible to edit such clips in the Pinnacle Studio iPAD app (quite a neat little app with an impressive set of features) - just something to consider for idle moments away from home - but alas, as yet, the app will only accept AVC(HD).mp4. Still, quite handy for editing native iPAD videos on the go. According to the developer, some film studios use it for reviewing/communicating 'dailys'.

So that's it. Not so much of a need now. Still, it would be useful to know what methods are available for demuxing m2t files, should the need arise again.

Cheers.
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Old 23rd November 2013, 01:38   #5  |  Link
WorBry
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghitulescu View Post
why ProjectX?
There are more appropriate demuxers around?
First tried with an older version of TMPGenc(3.0)Xpress -MPEG Tools- but no go. Did a web search on m2t demux. Someone, in response to a similar inquiry (on Video Help) recommended TMuxer or Project-X. TMuxer didn't work, Project-X did, but I wondered about the error flags. Simple as that.

So what GUI demuxer would you suggest as being more appropriate?

And, for interests sake, what would be your explanation for the error flags Project-X reported with these clips and their significance?

Cheers.
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Old 23rd November 2013, 07:08   #6  |  Link
manono
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WorBry View Post
So what GUI demuxer would you suggest as being more appropriate?
For anything MPEG I use DGIndex. File->Save Project and Demux Video.
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Old 23rd November 2013, 10:59   #7  |  Link
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The ProjectX error messages just mean that it is ignoring useless PIDs (Program IDentifiers). This is normal, and if you are happy with the results then you don't need to worry about these errors.

But ProjectX has really been developped to handle MPEG TS streams which have been broadcast via satellite or terrestrial signals. These TS streams mostly contain errors which are corrected by ProjectX during the demuxing process. So MPEG-TS is effectively converted to MPEG-PS.

I agree with manono that DGIndex is probably more approriate for your needs. Another alternative (if you don't like ffmpeg) is good old Rejig.


Cheers
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Old 23rd November 2013, 14:38   #8  |  Link
WorBry
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manono View Post
For anything MPEG I use DGIndex. File->Save Project and Demux Video.
And there it was right before my eyes. It's been a while since I've used DGIndex, and for the HDV decodes I've just let MeGUI's File Indexer do the work. Pretty lame excuse, huh?

Thanks.
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Old 23rd November 2013, 14:42   #9  |  Link
WorBry
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manolito View Post
The ProjectX error messages just mean that it is ignoring useless PIDs (Program IDentifiers). This is normal, and if you are happy with the results then you don't need to worry about these errors.

But ProjectX has really been developped to handle MPEG TS streams which have been broadcast via satellite or terrestrial signals. These TS streams mostly contain errors which are corrected by ProjectX during the demuxing process. So MPEG-TS is effectively converted to MPEG-PS.

I agree with manono that DGIndex is probably more approriate for your needs. Another alternative (if you don't like ffmpeg) is good old Rejig.
Cheers
manolito
Thanks for the explanation. Yes, in the light of the above, using Project-X is a bit like taking a hammer to crack a nut.

It's not that I don't like FFMPEG, it's just that I've never used it, at least as a command line tool. I really should clue myself up.

Thanks again.
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